Inside Boys’ Life
staff:

Wow, what a year!
tastefullyoffensive:

Nailed it. [x]

This could well have been my fine work.

tastefullyoffensive:

Nailed it. [x]

This could well have been my fine work.

A must see for any baseball fan, certainly a Reds or Yankees fan.

Richard Paul Evans, author of the popular Michael Vey series of books, answers questions from Boys’ Life readers.

theatlantic:

Sorry, Grand Canyon! Here’s a 200,000-Mile-Long Gulf on the Surface of the Sun

You’ve seen the sun erupt. But you’ve never seen the sun erupt quite like this.

Read more.

Really looking forward to this. “The Book Thief” is among the all-time great YA books.

zusakbooks:

#TheBookThief: International Trailer
"Good night…Book Thief."
The international trailer is out now, and there’s more of Max (Ben Schnetzer), more Rosa (Emily Watson)…and more of that dauntless Jesse Owens impersonator, Rudy Steiner (the always-gracious Nico Liersch). Wait for the words of his that kill me every time…As Death once said, he does something to me, that boy.
I hope you enjoy it. 

breakingnews:

Teenager discovers fossil of baby dinosaur
NBC News: In 2009, a teenager discovered the youngest fossil skeleton of a baby dinosaur that lived more than 70 million years ago. The 17-year-old spotted a bone from the skeleton on territory at the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah.
Paleontologists walked right past the bones before the student, Kevin Terris, found them. “He was just in the right place at the right time, looking in the right direction,” says Andrew Farke, curator of the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools.
Photo: Kevin Terris discovered the skeleton of a baby dinosaur named Joe in 2009, when he was a high-school student. (Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology, via NBC News)

breakingnews:

Teenager discovers fossil of baby dinosaur

NBC News: In 2009, a teenager discovered the youngest fossil skeleton of a baby dinosaur that lived more than 70 million years ago. The 17-year-old spotted a bone from the skeleton on territory at the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah.

Paleontologists walked right past the bones before the student, Kevin Terris, found them. “He was just in the right place at the right time, looking in the right direction,” says Andrew Farke, curator of the Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology at The Webb Schools.

Photo: Kevin Terris discovered the skeleton of a baby dinosaur named Joe in 2009, when he was a high-school student. (Raymond M. Alf Museum of Paleontology, via NBC News)

From SHAKE the book (www.ShakeTheBook.com), we bring you these mesmerizing dogs.